Omega Seamaster Diver in red gold and titanium

Omega Seamaster Diver in red gold and titanium

Don’t look now 007, but Omega has launched the 25th anniversary of the Seamaster Diver with a brand new collection slightly shrunken to 42mm and including this novel mix of titanium tantalum and red gold. The wave effect dial of the original piece reruns, albeit now laser engraved onto an enamel dial. Otherwise this watch would make a perfect partner to Daniel Craig 23 years after it debuted on Bond’s wrist. The lack of a date (a sign of a real tool watch) confers caliber 8806 status on its Metas-tested “grand chronometer” movement.

OMEGA first introduced the Seamaster 300 in 1957 – it was a watch designed especially for divers and professionals who worked underwater.

More than half a century later, the timepiece makes a comeback in a completely upgraded and enhanced form, ready for a new generation of adventurers. This Seamaster 300 has a sand-blasted blue dial with rhodium-plated hands coated with “vintage” Super-LumiNova. The polished ceramic bezel ring has a Liquidmetal™ diving scale.

The 41 mm brushed and polished grade 5 titanium case is presented on a matching bracelet. A transparent caseback makes it possible to see the anti-magnetic OMEGA Master Co-Axial calibre 8400 within.

Rolex Submariner Vs Explorer

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Rolex Glidelock System

While the Submariner goes into the deep, the Explorer (below) was built to scale mountain peaks, following Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay’s successful ascent of Mount Everest with their Oyster Perpetual timepieces.

Since it wasn’t made for deep-sea diving, the watch is waterproof up to 100m, unlike the Submariner’s 300m. This means you can still go swimming with it and do practically everything in your daily life with it. Just no expeditions to the Titanic wreckage, please.

MOVEMENT
Now that we’ve sorted out the basics, let’s look inside the watches. The Submariner here uses Calibre 3130 which is basically the same as the very reliable workhorse Calibre 3135, except it doesn’t have the date function. The previous Explorer also ran on Calibre 3130 but the new version here uses Calibre 3132, which includes the high-performance Paraflex shock absorbers. Both the Submariner and Explorer are certified Superlative Chronometers with a power reserve of 48 hours and feature the proprietary paramagnetic blue Parachrom hairspring.

When it comes to aesthetics, the basic models look similar with their stainless steel case, bracelet and black dial. However, the Submariner has a sportier feel, thanks to its uni-directional rotating bezel and slightly larger case (40mm to the Explorer’s 39mm). On the other hand, the Explorer, with its baton indexes and fixed stainless steel bezel, looks more versatile—you can take it hiking but also to a black tie gala.

PRICE
Now for many of us, this is what it really comes down to, isn’t it? For a sports model, you can expect the Submariner to cost more than an Explorerbut at about $10,000 for a basic model, it may be slightly out of reach for the average executive. Nevertheless, it’s still one of the most popular Rolex models around and stocks fly off the shelves as fast as Republicans ditch Donald Trump.

On the other hand, the Explorer’s $8,770 price tag is a little more manageable for an entry-level piece. Since both the Submariner and Explorer are comparable in terms of movement, the Explorer scores on versatility, value, and the sheer fact that it’s not going to be lost in the sea of Submariners out there.

At the end of the day, if this is your first Rolex, get the Explorer. But if you’re looking to expand your collection, a Submariner is an iconic piece you’d want to add to it.

Rate precision from Patek Philippe’s perspective

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One of the successful outcomes of the Patek Philippe Advanced Research project involved a significant reduction of the negative impact of the center – of – mass imbalance on the isochronism of the balance spring itself. A glance at the Spiromax ® balance spring made of Silinvar ® shows that the outer boss is now paired with an inner boss. The outer boss, also referred to as the Patek Philippe terminal curve, improves the isochronism of the balance in all positions by assuring the adequately concentric expansion and contraction of the balance spring. It compensates the disruption of isochronism caused by the escapement and the rotation of the balance regardless of the amplitude. Conversely, the inner boss offsets positional changes of the center of gravity to assure the highest possible rate accuracy in vertical orientations. For the owner, this means that the watch will not run slower or faster regardless of its orientation. The production of hairsprings with the DRIE process guarantees a perfect reproduced geometry, including the positional changes of its center of gravity. Because silicon cannot be deformed, its properties are not affected even when the watch is worn daily. The precisely defined geometry of the inner boss causes a controllable position change of the center of gravity while the spring contracts and expands. This significantly reduces or even eliminates the center – of – mass imbalance of the hairspring during each semi – oscillation. The result is a degree of rate accuracy that exceeds nearly all standards for mechanical watches regardless of their orientation.

Rate precision from Patek Philippe’s perspective

The Patek Philippe Seal imposes very stringent requirements on all of the manufacture’s mechanical watches. The mean rate of movements with a diameter of more than 20 mm must range within – 3 to +2 seconds per day. For Patek Philippe tourbillon timepieces, the tolerance is a strict 3 seconds per 24 hours. Hundreds of repetitive measurements performed by Patek Philippe’s certification laboratories have shown that a mechanical Patek Philippe movement with a Spiromax ® balance spring that has both an outer and an inner boss can be adjusted to a mean rate of – 1 to +2 seconds per 24 hours, which matches the rate accuracy of a Patek Philippe movement with a tourbillon.

Trailblazing technologies for a promising future

The new Spiromax ® balance spring with an inner and outer boss reconfirms the extraordinary benefits of Silinvar ® , the silicon derivative that Patek Philippe launched in 2005 as a world debut. Machining it with the DRIE process allows the geometry of the hairspring to be al tered at any location to systematically influence its oscillation behavior and thus its isochronism. This is an ambitious goal because a precise and dependable rate is an important prerequisite for assuring the successful future of the proud tradition of mechanical timekeeping. For this reason, Patek Philippe’s objective is to gradually integrate the balance spring with this geometry in its current production schedule. But Patek Philippe Advanced Research also extends to other fields as illustrated by the n ext innovation within the framework of this presentation.