The Rolex Military Submariner 5513

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When it comes to rare luxury watches that are sure to turn heads there are few that are as desirable as the Military Rolex Submariner 5513. Forget finding one of these watches in mint condition. Finding one at all is a victory for most collectors. The Royal Navy had about 1200 made in the 1970’s. It is said by some experts that only a few hundred exist in their original condition. Many of these watches have had parts replaced or have been destroyed over the years.

The dial is also a dead giveaway as two which reference of the Military Submariner you might have. The markers on a reference 5517 will have a much bolder look than the 5513 shown above.

Moving on to the watch hands you will notice that the Military Submariner’s arms can be a little different than the standard 5513. The Military issue 5513 sports one of two variations. The first uses the standard Mercedes hands. The latter will utilize two sword hands and has no Mercedes emblem. The Omega Seamaster has similar sword hands, which some people have used as replacements. A good collector should inspect the hands to ensure that they are in fact original.

The Bezel of the Milsub 5513 was specially crafted with an insert that may contain markings all the way around. The case is a standard 5513 but the spring bars are fitted with metal bars that use a NATO type strap. Because of this configuration the MilSub’s are not seen with a stainless steel strap unless modified.The caseback has a very unique set of symbols and numbers that will be different depending on the delivery date. Some of these models were delivered with Mercedes hands and others with 15-minute bezels. Identifying the correct reference before making an evaluation of a Milsub will be important.

On the back of each case there is a MOD number that begins with 0552 or W10. A triangle with a hat will be displayed directly below the issue and year numbers.

IWC Pilot Watch Collection

On Monday January 16th, 2012 the 21th edition of the Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie (SIHH) will start again, where 19 brands will be exhibiting their new marvelous watch collections. And, IWC just released the images of the Pilot’s Watch Chronograph Top Gun Miramar, named after the former location of the US Navy Fighter Weapons School (which is also known as TOP GUN).IWC Pilot Watch Chronograph Top Gun 2012

The 48 mm case is dark grey ceramic – in the photos it seems to have a glossy finish – with a dial that has faux patina and a green nylon strap. Inside is the IWC cal. 89365 flyback movement, similar to that in the Portuguese Chronograph Yacht Club.
Alongside the chronograph, the Top Gun Miramar range will also have a 48 mm Big Pilot with a similar design.It has been known for a while that this year IWC is unveiling a new range of Pilot watches. As the Pilot collection of IWC is a legendary and hard seller, the expectations are high. One model has been released already.

The press release also indicates that we can expect the following eye candies:

an all new Big Pilot’s Watch Top Gun Miramar with similar design elements as the Chronograph Top Gun Miramar and the same movement, caliber 51111, as the regular Big Pilot’s Watch;a first for the regular collection: new Big Pilot’s Watch Perpetual Calendar Top Gun features a perpetual calendar with its four-digit year display, moon phase display and seven-day power reserve;

What everyone expected: the size of the regular Pilot’s Watch Chronograph increase with 1 mm, now 43 mm in diameter.A logical move in the sequel: the launch of the new Pilot Watch Mark XVII with a diameter of 41 mm

The gold chrono is back: the Spitfire Chronograph with its IWC-manufactured 89365 calibre will be available in red gold.A long anticipated version: new Pilot’s Watch World Timer with a 24-hour ring that makes it possible to look at all 24 time zones, including the Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). The city ring shows the names of 23 places around the globe, each of which represents a time zone. The dial shows local time, which can be adjusted forwards or backwards in one-hour steps – also when crossing the International Date Line.

A new 46mm Pilot’s Watch Double Chronograph and features new red design elements on the dial.

REDESIGNED BREITLING CHRONOMAT B01 CHRONOGRAPH 44 HANDS-ON

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Breitling has been anything but under the radar the last couple of months. With Georges Kern at the helm, we’ve seen almost endless releases of new Navitimers (to mixed reviews and polarizing opinions, even among our team) but Breitling surprised us with the new Breitling Chronomat B01 Chronograph 44 at Baselworld this year. Modestly redesigned with a contemporary vibe in mind, the updated Chronomat is a welcome addition to Breitling’s modern catalog. Featuring their coveted B01 movement, a satin-brushed case, and reserved dial design, the Chronomat 44 takes an already rugged design and adds a bit more comprehension to it. We had a chance to try the modest (for Breitling anyway) new model and are here to give you our initial thoughts.

It’s been a little while since we’ve seen a significant update to the Chronomat or Avenger collections. Breitling took an aggressive approach to revamping the Superocean line with a dizzying slew of new models, followed this year by the controversial Navitimer collections. They peppered in a few updates (mainly the Chronomat 44 Boutique Edition and Super Avenger 01 Boutique Edition) accompanied by their heavy handed promotion of the new-ish B01 movement. But the boutique models have been largely unattainable and the collections have remained untouched for the last four or five years.

The reason I bring up both collections is because the new Chronomat 44 feels (to me anyway) like a fusion of the two. Let’s start with the case. The brushed stainless steel case measures in at an obvious 44mm with a relatively thick 16.95mm measurement off the wrist. Although, as is often the case with Breitling, it does feel a little bigger. The choice to go with the brushed case instead of the often standard polish found on almost all Chronomats, in my opinion, was a step in the right direction. The Chronomats have often looked ostentatious with the large numbered bezel and a high degree of polish, and the subdued Chronomat 44 doesn’t feel like a piece of jewelry, it feels like a tool – I’m actually reminded of the Chrono Avenger from Blood Diamond when I look at it.

THE BREGUET HERITAGE: A HANDS-ON LOOK AT HISTORY

The Breguet Heritage: A Hands-On Look At History, Manufacturing & Watches Inside the Manufacture

One could easily write a several-hundred-page-long book about Breguet – but one would be late to the party, as there are multiple fine publications about his awe-inspiring achievements. Hence, it would be highly irresponsible of us to try and bring all that accumulated historical knowledge into this article, but – as we said – we will cover all the important historical highlights and innovations, as well as what the brand has been up to since its Swatch Group-driven revival in 1999.

Abraham-Louis Breguet was born in 1747, in Neuchâtel, a little town that retains its high significance in the Swiss watch industry to this day. In his teens, he left the family home to first move to Versailles and then to Paris to pursue his studies as a watchmaker’s apprentice. In 1775, at the age of 28, he opened his workshop in the Ile de la Cité neighborhood of Paris – only a stone’s throw away from prestigious areas around the Louvre and Place Vendôme – with the assistance of a certain Abbot Joseph-François Marie, who helped the young watchmaker to not only get started under his own name but also to gain access to the French Court. Although the French aristocracy shortly began supporting the young watchmaker and entrepreneur, Breguet had to leave Paris during the French Revolution, only to return a few years later in 1795.This short summary may appear to be but a brief chapter in Breguet’s career, but we’d be awfully wrong to suggest that: let us take a quick look behind the scenes to better understand how early it was that his genius started to show in his work.

The First Automatic Winding Watch Caliber
It was in 1780, only five years into owning his workshop, that he developed the world’s first automatically wound watch caliber. Yes, the very basics of modern automatic watches were laid down by Breguets invention. His goal was to create a pocket watch that would need not be wound by a key (since winding a watch movement through the crown was not yet possible at the time), but that would rewind its mainsprings all by itself. His “perpétuelle” caliber featured an oscillating weight that would respond to the wearer’s hand gestures when holding the watch, as well as his movement when walking.