Olympic Games 2020 Speedmaster

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The watches are limited to 2020 pieces each and can be bought in a set of all 5. This set will be limited to 55 pieces. As you can see, three of the five watches are in stainless steel and the other two have a bit of gold added to them. In our opinion, it was about time that bi-colour returned to the Moonwatch. The last time was with the Apollo 15 35th Anniversary edition that came out in gold and steel, 1971 pieces only (in 2006). It is clear that Omega took the inspiration for these 5 limited edition models for the Olympic Games in 2020 from existing (or discontinued models). The aforementioned Apollo 15 35th anniversary edition is one of them, but what to think of the Mitsukoshi/Apollo 11 (2004) edition with the Panda dial, or the blue and white dial version that looks like the Gemini IV limited edition from 2005? The red bezel version and the green bezel version seem to be based on the recently released Master Chronometer Moonphase models. Perhaps these can be seen as the most original two versions of the pack. The green bezel Speedmaster uses 18-carat Sedna gold where the black bezel Speedmaster has 18-carat yellow gold for its pushers, crown and bezel. The hands, hour markers and sub-counter rings are also made of gold on both watches.

All five watches have ‘Speedmaster’ printed in red on the dial. The engraved case back is also the same for all watches, except for those thatcome in the set of 55 pieces only. Also, these watches have the same specifications as the regular Moonwatch, so a 42mm case with the hand-wound Lemania based calibre 1861 movement.

As you probably know, in 2020 the Olympic Games will take place in Japan and of course Omega will be the official timekeeper. In celebratio of the 2 year countdown towards these games, Omega introduced a special collection of Speedmaster. They’re inspired by the colours of the iconic Olympic Rings, similar to the set of 5 Seamasters for the 2018 Winter Games.

Cartier Santos Watch Review: The New For 2018 Model

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I reviewed the Cartier Santos 100 here on aBlogtoWatch a couple years ago and still feel very fondly about that model – but more on that later. Today my focus is on the new “Santos de Cartier” Large Model that Cartier released in early 2018. Cartier wanted to make sure the new Santos watches would hit stores soon after the debut (a practice not very common in the watch industry) and early reports are that sales of the new Santos models are strong. The specific model I reviewed is the Cartier Santos reference W2SA0006, which has a two-tone steel and 18k yellow gold case as well as the larger 39.8mm case (Cartier also produces a smaller 35.1mm wide version of the new Santos).

There is a lot to say about the Cartier Santos for 2018 and I discussed a lot of the overall collection details and highlights on this article here. In that article you’ll read more about the available models (and their prices) as well as what Cartier is trying to accomplish with the new Santos collection. This review will build on my discussion of the Santos in previous articles such as the above linked-to Santos 100 review.

Let me sum up the major highlights of the new for 2018 Cartier Santos watches. First, the cases and bracelets are significantly thinner and for some people, probably more comfortable to wear (as compared to the previous generation large-case models, like the Santos 100 Large). There is also the new bezel design which isn’t a huge element, but it does offer a rather distinctive look for the new models. The case contains an in-house automatic movement, and of course the biggest news is the quick release (“QuickSwitch” as Cartier calls it) bracelet/strap system, as well as the tool-less link changing system that lets you adjust the bracelet quickly, easily, and without tools (assuming you currently have fingernails).

My overall impressions of the Cartier Santos Large Model are very good. Some also say that the smaller model can also be worn as a men’s watch, but I’m pretty sure that in the West, the vast majority of 35.1mm wide Santos models will be sold to women. Aside from the size, the primary difference between the larger and smaller Santos model is the placement of a date window display (which exists on the larger model but not on the smaller model).

LONGINES LEGEND DIVER IN BLACK REF. L3.774.2.50.9

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This Longines Legend Diver in Black (reference L3.774.2.50.9) is just like the other Legend Divers, part of the heritage collection. A collection that is only a small portion of Longines annual production of an estimated 1.3 million pieces. A huge number, but the number of different references from Longines is also quite impressive. The heritage collection is mainly aimed at enthusiasts and collectors, that’s one of the reasons why our Longines coverage is mainly based on those watches.If there’s one modern Longines that left me with a huge impression, it is the Longines Legend Diver. Preferably the version without date, but CEO Walter von Känel decided otherwise a few years ago and discontinued the non-date model. This year, Longines added some variation to the Legend Diver, with this all black version. Meet the Longines Legend Diver in Black.

The Longines Legend Diver in Black uses the Longines calibre L888.2 movement, which is based on the ETA A31.L01 movement. This movement ticks at 25,200vph, which is a rather unusual frequency, but Omega’s Co-Axial calibres also use this speed for example. The movement has a power reserve of 64 hours. This ETA A31.L01 is based on the well-known and much praised ETA 2892-A2 movement that you’re most probably familiar with. They slowed down the beat rate of this movement, and extended the power reserve. This ETA A31.L01 is exclusively manufactured and produced for Longines, to be used as their L888.2 movement. Since 1984 or so, Longines doesn’t produce movements in-house anymore and everything is being supplied by ETA (that just like Longines also belongs to Swatch Group). Although Longines is pretty clear (read our interview with CEO Walter von Känel here) that they don’t aim to become a manufacturer of movements again, but rather focus on being able to offer affordable (mechanical) watches, it is quite interesting that they do seem to shift towards the use of movements exclusively produced for them. Their introduction of the VHP movements and the chronometer certified Record collection also shows that Longines feels it has become more important for the consumer that a movement should be something special.